End Sheet…group exhibition

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog
Invitation image

Invitation image

End sheet is a group exhibition which opened yesterday at the ArtEC gallery in Port Elizabeth.

End Sheet 2014

As the final exhibition on the artEC calendar for 2014 we thought it fitting to make reference to the final page of every book, the page that, despite being devoid of textual content, marks an assimilatory shift from book into life. The End Sheet binds not only the physical book, the cover to the text-pages, but also denotes the transition from text into life marking the readers contribution to authorship.

Reading a book is by no means a linear retracing of its author’s intentions but rather an interpretative appropriation of the text, which produces a different text in the mind of each reader, the last page holds a revolutionary event: the constant dialogue between author and reader.
The words read interweave, wrap themselves in the feelings, the experiences and knowledge of the reader, a mesh of two worlds that forms and opens new imaginary spaces. Are there interfaces, overlays or points of the world of the reader with the world of the author, enabling the formation of a new reality?

How far is it possible to capture the new imagery? …

Artists were invited to submit the results of their obsessions on paper. The torn, pressed, ripped, wrinkled and stained drawings, prints and illustrations for an exhibition that celebrates paper.

Young wife: Choice of husband. Embroidery on rubber and altered page. 2014

Young wife: Choice of husband. Embroidery on rubber and altered page. 2014

Young wife: Open your mouth. Embroidery on rubber and altered page. 2014

Young wife: Open your mouth. Embroidery on rubber and altered page. 2014

Young wife: instrument of torture. Embroidery on rubber, altered page. 2014

Young wife: instrument of torture. Embroidery on rubber, altered page. 2014

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I dare you to PLAY at Nirox scuplture park

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog

I am happy to inform you that my work will be exhibited in the company of a lot of amazing artists at this group show:

12 October public opening flyer-01 2

So if you ever wanted to punch me in the face: now is your chance

"I dare you" embroidery on rubber 2014 (detail)

“I dare you” embroidery on rubber 2014 (detail)

So if you decide to attend this exhibition, “I dare you” to punch me and e-mail me the photos: hannalie.t@gmail.com.

While working on this piece I was wondering if “Boxing” can be seen as a game or is it purely a sport?

"I dare you" Embroidered punching bag. 2014

“I dare you” Embroidered punching bag. 2014

My son aged four, likes to punch almost everything these days, and I do hope its only just a stage he’s going through.  I said to him that he should warn his brother that he’s going to punch him beforehand otherwise he might not think it’s a game and will get cross.

While this work was hanging in my studio, the little one came in and started punching it….He said to me: “…but Mom, this is not an artwork, it’s a punching bag”.

my four year old son interacting with my work

my four year old son interacting with my work

This exhibition will also be an experiment for me to see how my work cope outside in the wind, rain and sunshine for such a long period of time (exhibition runs until 30 December!).  I wonder if the thread will lose it’s colour etc.

I will unfortunately not be able to attend this event, since it’s so far from where we live, but I do hope that some of you can go.

For more information and updates you are welcome to visit this site:  http://cargocollective.com/playanexhibition

 

 

 

 

reminder

Art portfolio- my work

“Not part of the fairytale…” aka Spiderman together with “No hard feelings” is hanging out at the Bayliss Gallery until the 27th of May! So if you are in the Gauteng area, feel free to go and visit them. x

"Not part of the fairytale, but hang in there" embroidery on rubber/inner tube

“Not part of the fairytale, but hang in there” embroidery on rubber/inner tube

"No hard feelings" embroidery on rubber/inner tube

“No hard feelings” embroidery on rubber/inner tube

The subversive f-word

Art portfolio- my work

Once in a while I treat myself.  Yesterday this treat arrived in the mail:

subversive sitch

In art school they taught us art history.  Since I taught myself to embroider I consider it a good idea to home-school myself in the history of embroidery.

On page 5 Rozsika Parker (the author of the above book) touches on the hierarchy of art/craft:

“The art/craft hierarchy suggests that art made with thread and art made with paint are intrinsically unequal:  that the former is artistically less significant.  But the real differences between the two are in terms of where they are made and who makes them.  Embroidery, by the time of the art/craft divide, was made in the domestic sphere, usually by women, for ‘love’.  Painting was produced predominantly, though not only, by men in the public sphere, for money.  The professional branch of embroidery, unlike that of painting, was, from the end of the seventeenth century to the end of the nineteenth century, largely in the hands of working-class women, or disadvantaged middle-class women.  Clearly there are huge differences between painting and embroider;’ different conditions of production and different conditions of reception.  But rather than acknowledging that needlework and painting are different but equal arts, embroidery and crafts associated with ‘the second sex’ or the working class are accorded lesser artistic value”

mmm….I’ll think about that.

This brings me to the f-word: Feminism….

“Moreover, because embroidery was supposed to signify femininity – docility, obedience, love of home, and a life without work – it showed the embroiderer to be a deserving, worthy wife and mother.  Thus the art played a crucial part in maintaining the class position of the household, displaying the value of a man’s wife and the condition of his economic circumstances…….Later the embroidery was blamed for the conflicts provoked in women by the femininity the art fostered.”  P 11 The Subversive Stitch.

I personally belief that a mother’s place is at home, with her children- at least for the first formative 5 years.  My own mother was a stay at home mom, but I’m sure she had dreams, because shortly after we were enrolled in primary school she started her own company and trained as a florist; but I’m grateful that she was at home in the beginning.

Quote from unknown book found in old journal

Quote from unknown book found in old journal

At the same time I dislike the fact that she was a very subordinate wife.

"I'm not a pushover" embroidery on rubber/inner tube in box frame

“I’m not a pushover” embroidery on rubber/inner tube in box frame

So before I become hysterical….lets move on from one f-word to another: “Freud”

“”By the end of the century, Freud was to decide that constant needle work was one of the factors that ‘rendered women particularly prone to hysteria’ because daydreaming over embroidery induced ‘dispositional hypnoid states.”  P12 the Subversive Stitch

I’m looking forward to see if this book will have an influence on my work and artist statement in the near future, but so far it’s a great read.