Join the party!

Art portfolio- my work

This is a #fairwarning to join the party!

#fairwarning!

you don’t have to suffer from FOMO

FOMO 70 x 18 x 10 cm Cotton thread, polyester fiber filling and rubber 2020 Hannalie Taute

so put a smile onto your face…

Put a smile on your face

because there is a change of plans

Change of plans

We would like to welcome you with arms wide open for the annual Turbine Art Fair

With arms wide open

…because shit is getting real – virtually!

shit’s getting real

It is going to be HOT!

HOT

AAAH-HAAA!

HAAA-AAAH! (SOLD)

There will even be a “Neighbourhood watch”:

And this little guy promises you a whale of a time:

a whale of a time

even if there is a wild goose chase

Sweet-tooth would like you to Eatmore and Seemore!

Sowaar as Padda-manel! So stop Horsing around because you can’t touch this!

You have to earn your stripes!

earn your stripes SOLD

…even among a (K)not of snakes!

(k)not of snakes 215 x 108 cm cotton thread and rubber 2018

for more info please visit Millennium gallery, or contact Ronel at https://www.millenniumgallery.co.za/about

Join the party Installation view

.In warm water. On Being. A Womxn. Show

Art portfolio- my work

In warm water, cotton thread, doillies and rubber 2017 (photographed by Kleinjan Groenewald)

Did you know that a female octopus is known as a hen? – (source: internet)

“In the octopus world, females are boss. They are often larger than males and can pose quite a threat. The male is in a troublesome position because he wants to pass on his genes by mating with a female, but females can turn on their partner quick, strangling him and bringing his carcass back to her den as a meal.” (source: http://www.study.com)

In warm water = to be in or get into a difficult situation in which you are in danger of being criticized or punished

 “Prioritizing their motherly duties, females stop eating. But she doesn’t starve to death–rather,when the eggs hatch the female’s body turns on her. Her body undertakes a cascade of cellular suicide, starting from the optic glands and rippling outward through her tissues and organs until she dies”. (source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com

“The scientific jury is still out as to why these clever, resourceful creatures meet such an ignominious end, but there are several theories. Octopuses are serious cannibals, so a biologically programmed death spiral may be a way to keep mothers from eating their young.” (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com)

on being a woman in the arts, on being a woman in South Africa, on being a woman in this world.

ON BEING is a group show featuring some of South Africa’s finest contemporary artists working in a range of mediums: painting, sculpture, drawing, ceramic and mixed media.

Does one celebrate women’s day in South Africa whilst we are facing a national crisis in gender-based violence? Is it tokenism to celebrate women for one day (or a month)? We asked these questions in discussions for this show. Women artists have and continue to hold their own in our space year-round. However, any opportunity to highlight women- we will take. The title of the show aims to speak to the lived experience of women in this country; it calls for celebration and mourning, as being a woman in South Africa means both. 

This exhibition features works not specifically made for a women’s exhibition, but have been selected by the curators as to offer an insight into the interior world of being a woman and to celebrate our artists by highlighting their work. 

We remember the 20 000+ women who marched on the streets in 1956. We pay tribute to them for their courage and strength. We pay tribute to all our women artists. We look to the future, knowing that there is still much to do.”  EVERARD READ FRANSCHOEK GALLERY PRESS RELEASE

The group Exhibition: “ON BEING/A WOMXN’S show” at Everard Read Franschoek openend yesterday and will run until the 7th of September 2020. Please visit their website for more information.

Come hell or high water…opening night

Studio news

What I wore: rubber collar in collaboration with the Tailor: William Mills from Stilbaai

A big thank you to everyone who came to the opening of Come Hell or High Water at Lizamore & Associates gallery on the 5th of October!

With Teresa Lizamore at Lizamore & Associates gallery

Images courtesy of the gallery – Lizamore & Associates

Rubber collar: a collaboration with the Tailor: William Mills

Boots: Heels to Heaven

Vintage lace dress: a gift from my friend Camille Haupt

Remain(s) :a Group exhibition

Studio news
I am delighted to be included in this group exhibition at DF Contemporary Gallery.
You are welcome to view the full catalogue here.
remains2

Details

MAIN GALLERY:
Ayanda Mabulu
Blessing Ngobeni
Peter Mammes
Jimmy Law
Neil Nieuwoudt
Dirk Brahmann
Christiaan Diedericks
Luan Nel
Hannalie Taute
Stephen Rosin
Anton Karstel
Frans Smit
Henk Serfontein
Phillip Heenop
Ruan Janse van Vuuren
INVESTORS LOUNGE:
Anton Karstel
Ayanda Mabullu

CURATORIAL STATEMENT:
From the shrunken heads of the Amazon to the spun-sugar calavera candies of a Mexican November or the bleached bones of a Georgia O’Keeffe painting, skulls have long exerted a mystical pull on the human imagination. They have also been eternally attractive to students of pure science through the ages; every feature from the shape of sagittal ridges to the functions of cerebral cortexes have been and continue to be studied in laboratories, in the most minutely intimate detail.
This spirit of memento mori (Latin for ‘remember [that you have] to die’) as well as momento vivere (Latin for ‘remember [that you must live]’),, is fundamental to the iconography of the skull, making it a shorthand – and focal point – for our own obsession with (im)mortality. Like Hamlet, we hold up Yorick’s skull, and try to make sense of our pointless, transient lives.
It is the ultimate equalizer; permanently en courant, whether sashaying the catwalk on Alexander McQueen’s scarfs, bags and rings, or in the most bejeweled and bewitching of all its forms such as Damien Hirst’s diamond-encrusted skull For the Love of God, 2007. Perhaps these popular cultural references are the most resonant of all – as Dia de Muertos’ dissolving sugar skull reminds us that nothing can perpetuate our existence forever.
In essence then, the skull is the ultimate tabula rasa, reminding us with its relentless anonymity, ambiguity and androgyny that in death we are all equal. Our differences – in colour, creed, social status or wealth – will dissolve like the flesh from our bones, and kings, lawyers and servants will all be reduced to the same essential structure at the last.
Evoking admiration, awe and morbid fascination, the skull endures as a macabre, unifying symbol of the human condition, inviting interpretation at every turn whilst denying that any reading can ever be definitive. It is provocative. Inevitable. A relic of our past and an omen of our unavoidable future.

The skull is one of man’s oldest and most powerful symbols. It has a long and varied history of use with multiple overlapping interpretations. Most commonly it is seen as a representation of death and mortality, but it has many other uses including:

– To invoke fear or caution.
– To celebrate the memory of the dead.
– To celebrate life.
– As a symbol of vanity.
– As a symbol of life after death.
– As a symbol of change.
– As a means of obtaining good luck or avoiding bad luck.
– As a symbol of toughness, machismo, courage, bravery or indifference to death and danger.
– As a symbol of nonconformity, free-thinking, and rebelliousness.
– For popular appeal and fashion.
– As pure decoration especially as tattoos.

For more information contact DF Contemporary Gallery.

Detail of "Only teasing"

Detail of “Only teasing”