Flux – a group exhibition

Studio news, Studio news/blog

Dear friends,


A group of South-African Artists from conceptual Art, Design and Craft disciplines were invited to exhibit together. The exhibition explores instances where the boundaries between art,  design and craft flow into one another. It focuses on artists who reinvent traditional techniques of “crafts” like embroidery, bead-work, weaving, carpentry and paper cutting. It also explores the meaning and importance of craftsmanship in contemporary art practices.

 so…..

I decided to submit ‘self-/portraits’ for this exhibition since portraiture is a very old art form and was probably pioneered by the Egyptians and the Greeks, but in the Middle-ages Self-portraiture was a starting point because it was an age preoccupied by personal salvation and self-scrutiny.
Today self-portraits flood the internet and children in school are required to make them.
I am using a traditional craft technique= embroidery, in conjunction with the age old art-form of portraits onto an unconventional material =rubber.
Upon closer inspection, you will also notice that there is a difference in the way the “rubber canvas” (so to speak) of all 3 portraits were prepared:

In the piece titled: “Safe”

the rubber canvas consists of tiny hexagon rubber shapes which were stitched together by hand to form the basis of this work.

detail of the work titled “Safe”

“I’ll be watching you” cotton thread, rubber, batting and wood (photo Alex Hamilton)

In the piece above “I’ll be watching you”  you’ll notice that once piece of a big tractor inner tube were used;

and in the piece below “Don’t make waves”, rubber squares were stitched together with an industrial sewing machine to form the ‘rubber-canvas’

Don’t make waves 54 x 35 cm Cotton thread, batting, rubber and wood – framed (Photographer Kleinjan Groenewald) 2017

Anyway, so if you are in the Bloemfontein area, feel free to pop in at the Flux group exhibition xxx

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Desire…

Studio news

Dear friends, the “Desire” group exhibition opened recently at the Association of Arts in Pretoria. I am super excited to share the online catalogue with you today!:

If you would like a ‘hard’ copy…here is what the curator Johan Conradie has to say:

The DESIRE group exhibition e-catalogue is out and looking MIGHTY FINE, thanks to the amazing talent of the artists on board and the diligent work by Karl Gustav on the layout. The show is on at Association of Arts Pretoria from 14 October – 2 November, and not to be missed! Normally “silence is golden”… Not in this case 😉 Please let us know what you think… (Hard copies of the catalogue can be ordered by dropping Nandi an email at artspta@mweb.co.za clearly marked as “DESIRE catalogue order”. Price per unit: R180. 60 full-colour pages in Velvet finish. Please provide your name, contact number and email address. Clear instructions will be send to you regarding payment and collection details. The catalogue will go into print end Oct, so place your order as soon as possible. Limited copies available).

Princess in the Veld

Studio news/blog

As promised…here’s more info about this fantastic group show curated by Adele Adendorff.  Feeling very excited, blessed and thankful that my work is included in this show amongst wonderful fellow female South African artists.

The Princess in the Veld showcases a selection of sculpture works produced by local, contemporary female artists and contemplates the position of women in our current South African dispensation and forms part of the 2015 KKNK arts festival in Oudtshoorn. The exhibition hosts works by Frances Goodman, Doreen Southwood, Reshma Chhiba, Wilma Cruise, Karin Lijnes, Hannalie Taute and Larita Engelbrecht. Despite South Africa’s democratically premised constitution and the passing of numerous revised bills advocating the rights of women, female emancipation remains unrealised: Highlighted by high crime statistics of rape and domestic violence and prejudice against women in the workplace and society at large. Although a far more proactive approach is needed in order to enact real change for women in South Africa, this exhibition aspires to raise awareness of, and stimulate discussion around, the plight of women.

The ‘princess’, as part of the title, is employed as a thoroughly fabled, and somehow condescending, designation for women and underscores the relation between female identity and (gendered) space. The South African social landscape, still dominated by parochial views of women, is viewed as a space riddled with fallacies regarding femininity – a condition that merely serves to perpetuate the oppression of women. As an illustration of these literal and metaphoric spaces evident in society, fairy tales (narratives based on idealised and stereotypical notions of women) are utilised within the context of The princess in the veld as a curatorial slant to mirror these defunct views and abusive practices towards South African women. Fairy tales generally position female protagonists as extensions of particular (gendered) spaces within the narrative – private spaces, the domestic realm and nature) – spaces that are often shaped by (and upheld by) traditional roles assigned to women.

Despite the signs of prejudice scripted within the pages of these tales, alternative readings could, adversely, offer opportunity for transformation: The conventional fairy tale plot leads the heroine (usually spurred on by curiosity or emotion) into unfamiliar (and often forbidden) territory – a space generally designated by the forest, or in the case of indigenous tales, the veld. The word ‘veld’, as part of the title of the exhibition, suggests uncultivated, leveled grasslands associated with the South African landscape, in particular, the Karoo. The curated space therefore acts as a metaphor for the veld, wherein positive accounts of heterogeneous and transformative female identity could be shaped, illuminated by the selection of artworks, expressive of an empowered sense of femininity. As part of a kind of ‘corrective’ curatorial approach and the desire to reconceptualise female identity, the veld is conceived of as a space that engenders freedom from the constraints persistent in society, and serves to revise perceptions regarding female identity. The fairy tale is then employed as a curatorial mechanism that, on the one hand, emphasises the pervasiveness of conventional and essentialised notions of femininity and, on the other, promotes the emancipation of women that exist within the interstices these binaries yield. The bodies of work of the artists selected for this ensemble allude to the underlying notions prevalent in fairy tales of European and African origin in order to align with the premise of the show. words by Adele Adendorff as well as images below.