Four days in the Art World

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog

So as you know the Turbine Art Fair happened over the weekend from 11 – 14 July 2019…and I would like to share my adventures with you:

Oh my what big wings you have said mini-me

The adventure started on the 10th of July, flying to Johannesburg with my Mini-me companion. Why is she called Mini-Me you might ask, well…

Me and Mini-me

In preparation for the fair I started to re-read the book: Seven days in the art world by Sarah Thorton, and I quote:

“Poe believes that an art fair can be a tough environment for an artist. ‘ If they are any good, they make art because they have to. They don’t do it to please the market. So for some artists, hanging out here can mess with their heads.”

I wanted to test this theory and check it out for myself.

Anyway, I had my first Gautrain experience where i almost got fined for chewing gum, because in all the excitement I did not notice this sign!

Gautrain station

OPENING NIGHT 11/07/2019 (Thursday)

Installation view at the Turbine art fair – opening night. Photo credit: Sherilea Gaspar

On the opening night I wore a rubber hooped skirt and rubber collar, (envisioned by me, but created with the help from the Tailor: William Mills in  Stilbaai.) The headdress I embroidered and made myself. (It used to be the wings of another sculpture that I took apart)

I really love the colour of the wall, which was the idea of the Millennium gallery who represented my work at the fair. I feel it really complimented the work installed.

The opening night was great, and I’ll admit that I felt like some sort of princess at a ball, having a ball 😉 …..(to have a ball. (Enjoy oneself enormously, as in It was a great trip—I had a ball. This idiom uses the noun ball in the sense of “a gala dance.” [ Slang; 1920s])

FRIDAY (open to the public) 12/07/2019

I enjoy dressing up since age 5, and for events like these, i like to wear the medium I make my art with…rubber. So on this day I decided to only wear the rubber crown, but with a rubber collar and some dramatic make-up:

Photographer: Alon Skuy

The photo below was taken in the Millennium gallery booth…who also exhibited the work of Norman Catherine (see the artworks behind me). It was an honor for me that my work was exhibited in the same space as his and also with the work by artist Colbert Mashile (whose work was on the opposite wall)

JULY 12, 2019. Hannalie Taute, , at The Millennium Gallery. RMB Turbine Art Fair (RMB TAF) Its the 7th edition of the Fair. “RMB TAF, since its inception in 2013, has grown extensively year on year and 2019 will see the most substantial Fair yet in a new location – 10 Fricker Rd, Illovo from 12 – 14 July with a preview evening on 11 July.” PHOTOGRAPH: ALON SKUY

SATURDAY 13/07/2019

…its time to introduce you to the owner of the Millennium Gallery: Ronel van der Vyfer!

with Ronel van der Vyfer director of the Millennium gallery based in Pretoria

“A great dealer does a good job for the collector but a great job for the artist. A great adviser does a good job for the artist but a great job for the collector.” (another quote from the book: Seven days in the art world.)

SUNDAY 14/07/2019

So on Sunday I wore A blue dress, and fellow artist Zelda Stroud mentioned that outfit reminds her of the “Blourokkies” I was not familiar with this term and she explained it to me, but here is the shortened version found on the internet:

2. colloquial. [Named for the sky-blue uniform of the sect.] A name given to a woman belonging to the Pentecostal ‘Latter Rain’ or ‘Spade Reën’ sect.

[1972 The women..wear a uniform consisting of a sky-blue dress worn well below the knee, with headdress to match…This uniform ensures that they are modestly and neatly dressed, independently of changing fashions.]
In retrospect i find this fascinating, since I wasn’t familiar with this sect, and I’m not religious in this sense,  but funny enough I chose to wear this on a Sunday with a very different headdress than what I can imagine they wore back then 😉
another definition I found is this:

1. Prison slang. rare. [Probably by analogy with Afrikaans bloubaadjie the blue jacket worn in the past by long-term male prisoners (see bloubaadjie).] A female habitual criminal, sentenced to an indeterminate period in goal; this sentence. See also blue-coat sense 1.

1969 A. Fugard Boesman & Lena 7 Oppas they don’t get you. Blourokkie next time they catch you stealing.
The latter definition fits with the helmet I wore (sondebok) 😉
anyway…..

Highlights of the fair include meeting fascinating people ranging from art students, fellow artists, friends, art lovers young and old and of course interesting art collectors:

“It’s not just about buying a piece. Its about buying into someone’s life and where they are going with it.  Its a mutual commitment, which is pretty intense.” – quote from the book: Seven days in the Art World.

One of the interesting art collectors with my work: wild thing. It makes me smile every time I see this image

“Collector should be and earned category. An artist doesn’t become an artist in a day, the same with a collector.  It’s a lifetime commitment and a life process.” quoted from the book: Seven days in the art world by Sarah Thornton.

So there you have it dear friends…I would like to thank each and everyone responsible for making this one helluva unforgettable experience!

I’ll leave you with this quote I found on the internet by Tennessee Williams:

“Has it ever struck you that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quick you hardly catch it going?”

 

 

 

 

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A knot of snakes

Art portfolio- my work

(k)not of snakes 215 x 108 cm cotton thread and rubber 2018

detail 1

detail 2

detail 3

detail 4

Currently showing at 99 Loop gallery as part of my solo exhibition “Minutes to Midnight”. Until 27 October 2018

Installation view

Minutes to Midnight and World Embroidery Day

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog

Minutes to midnight 215 x 106 cm cotton thread, doillies and rubber 2018

Minutes to Midnight is the title of the work above as well as the title for my upcoming solo exhibition at 99 Loop Gallery in Cape Town.

minutes to midnight detail

For a long time my thoughts centered around the words “Minutes to midnight” as a title for a possible solo show, and after many attempts, planning, and  discussions the works of the past few years (some new, some reworked) all fit together and finally I am looking forward to present the body of work soon (October 2018).

“Minutes to Midnight” is basically a continuation of my investigation of fear, which in turn lead me to the notion of time and eventually to the meaning behind the words: “Minutes to midnight” which actually refers to the symbolic clock used by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. This symbolic clock represents the countdown to a potential global catastrophe, and refers to this catastrophe as “Midnight”. It is currently standing on 2 minutes to Midnight.

Midnight in turn also reminded me about all the fairytales in which when the clock strikes 12 the magic disappears.

Minutes to midnight detail

But before you think it is all gloom and doom in this post, I have something uplifting to share with you as well:

I found out this morning, that it is World Embroidery Day today!  I saw it on a fellow embroiderer’s Instagram account*, and decided to google it to find out more.

The origins of the World Embroidery Day date back to 30 June 2011 and was an initiative of the Swedish Embroidery Guild, to celebrate embroidery (what a wonderful idea). I even found their Embroidery Manifesto which I would like to share with you:

embroidery_manifesto_-english (1)

Or you can visit this website to Download in 5 other languages:

http://www.broderiakademin.nu/worldembroideryday/

minutes to midnight detail

So I would like to celebrate and wish you a wonderful “World Embroidery Day”. Until we speak again – happy stitching!

Footnotes and links:

*The fellow embroiderer I mentioned is: Nicole O’ Loughlin and there is a lovely interview with her on the Fiber Studio’s blog. click here

*Early this year the “Doomsday Clock” reach 2 Minutes to Midnight…the closest ever…you can read more about it here

or visit the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists website… here

*You may download the Embroidery Manifesto here

*For more details about my upcoming solo you can watch this space or contact the gallery 99 Loop, see here

*The photographer of my artwork is Kleinjan Groenewald, you can visit his website here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote of the day from “The Muse”

Studio news

Detail: “Her dark side- fetish” embroidered rubber
Photographer Kleinjan Groenewald.

“Isaac had talked on occasion about about art, about famous painters and what made someone stand out from the rest.

‘Novelty’, he always said, ‘makes the difference’.

It was the fact that they were unlike the rest.

‘You can be a brilliant draughtsman’, he said, ‘but that means nothing if you’re not seeing the world differently.”

From the book “The muse” by Jessie Burton

Flux – a group exhibition

Studio news, Studio news/blog

Dear friends,


A group of South-African Artists from conceptual Art, Design and Craft disciplines were invited to exhibit together. The exhibition explores instances where the boundaries between art,  design and craft flow into one another. It focuses on artists who reinvent traditional techniques of “crafts” like embroidery, bead-work, weaving, carpentry and paper cutting. It also explores the meaning and importance of craftsmanship in contemporary art practices.

 so…..

I decided to submit ‘self-/portraits’ for this exhibition since portraiture is a very old art form and was probably pioneered by the Egyptians and the Greeks, but in the Middle-ages Self-portraiture was a starting point because it was an age preoccupied by personal salvation and self-scrutiny.
Today self-portraits flood the internet and children in school are required to make them.
I am using a traditional craft technique= embroidery, in conjunction with the age old art-form of portraits onto an unconventional material =rubber.
Upon closer inspection, you will also notice that there is a difference in the way the “rubber canvas” (so to speak) of all 3 portraits were prepared:

In the piece titled: “Safe”

the rubber canvas consists of tiny hexagon rubber shapes which were stitched together by hand to form the basis of this work.

detail of the work titled “Safe”

“I’ll be watching you” cotton thread, rubber, batting and wood (photo Alex Hamilton)

In the piece above “I’ll be watching you”  you’ll notice that once piece of a big tractor inner tube were used;

and in the piece below “Don’t make waves”, rubber squares were stitched together with an industrial sewing machine to form the ‘rubber-canvas’

Don’t make waves 54 x 35 cm Cotton thread, batting, rubber and wood – framed (Photographer Kleinjan Groenewald) 2017

Anyway, so if you are in the Bloemfontein area, feel free to pop in at the Flux group exhibition xxx