Untitled (Saint)

Art portfolio- my work

(Untitled) Saint 1110 x 700 mm Cotton thread, fabric and rubber (my work photographed by Kleinjan Groenewald)

“It is ingrained in all living creatures, first of all, to preserve their own safety, to guard against what is harmful and to strive for what is advantageous.”

-Saint Ambrose

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“Patience is the companion of wisdom” Saint Augustine

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meet the artist part 4 – feelings and flowers

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog

Dear friends the other day I was sitting at my son’s cricket practice at school, stitching a couple of leaves and another mom asked me what I am doing. I tried to explain my work to her and had a hard time doing so.  Even when I know exactly what I should have said, I struggled to make her understand without showing any images.

So to practice I decided to write about it here. This is part 4 of 13….

I love contradictions.  Dichotomies fascinate me for eg:  Art/Craft, Success/Failure, good/bad, pure/sullied, masculine/feminine, self/other, nature/culture, life/death, human/divine, sacred/profane … and the list goes on…

I have a lot of conflicted feelings about the world we live in and sometimes those feelings extend to my work.

These days I mainly stitch flowers. A couple of years ago if you told me that I would stitch flowers, I would have said: No way Jose!

Hannalie Taute studio wall photographed by Kleinjan Groenewald 2020

If I think back now, I guess it started with marigolds for my Stink Afrikaner exhibition in 2016.

I am fascinated by the idea that flowers can be seen as a language of sorts. (see floragraphy) and that it can be used as a symbol for emotions or a code.  Inspired by codes, I learned about the Voynich Manuscript which in turn inspired me to embroider real as well as imaginary flowers.  The Victorians used flowers to send ‘secret’ messages.

I find joy in the process of stitching a variety of blooms on small pieces of rubber and then later arrange them in bouquet-like pieces.  Almost like building a puzzle.  And then of course there are the contradiction of stitching flowers onto rubber, which i like.  It is also an ode to my mother, to a time when she was a florist, but at that stage I didn’t pay attention to her creations, partly because i was too young i guess.

What is your favorite flower?

Sy is so boos sy kan slange vang….

Art portfolio- my work

Sy is so boos sy kan slange vang approx 170 x 134 cm 2018 Cotton thread and rubber

detail

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*one of the pieces I decided to ‘rework’ in 2018

*one of the early pieces where i still hand-stitched the rubber background to form a canvas.

*photographs of my works courtesy of Kleinjan Groenewald

*On exhibition at 99 Loop gallery until 27 October 2018

opening night at 99 Loop gallery, Cape Town with visitors and friends..(.installation view.)

Jabberwocky

Art portfolio- my work

“And, as in uffish thought he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!”

-Lewis Carroll, 1872

from the poem titled Jabberwocky, which is currently my son Stephan’s favourite poem, especially when his dad reads it to him with a Scotttish accent.

He sees monsters everywhere detail

Initially my eldest son, inspired this work, because he used to see ‘monsters’ everywhere. He is quite tall for his age, thus looks older than he is, and he doesn’t like sleeping.  He is also blessed with a vivid imagination.

I am constantly amazed how two children from the same household can be so different from each other. Where Etienne is sensitive and fearful, his brother Stephan fierce and a handful. I say this in the most loving and respectful way. I love them both in every-way.

He sees monsters everywhere 2016

Lizard King

Art portfolio- my work

 

‘I am the Lizard King
I can do anything
I can make the earth stop in its tracks
I made the blue cars go away

sun sun sun

burn burn burn

MOON, MOON, MOON

i will get you

soon, soon, soon

i am the lizard king

i can do anything

-The Doors –

Celebration Of The Lizard

photos of this work courtesy : Val Wessels