.In warm water. On Being. A Womxn. Show

Art portfolio- my work

In warm water, cotton thread, doillies and rubber 2017 (photographed by Kleinjan Groenewald)

Did you know that a female octopus is known as a hen? – (source: internet)

“In the octopus world, females are boss. They are often larger than males and can pose quite a threat. The male is in a troublesome position because he wants to pass on his genes by mating with a female, but females can turn on their partner quick, strangling him and bringing his carcass back to her den as a meal.” (source: http://www.study.com)

In warm water = to be in or get into a difficult situation in which you are in danger of being criticized or punished

 “Prioritizing their motherly duties, females stop eating. But she doesn’t starve to death–rather,when the eggs hatch the female’s body turns on her. Her body undertakes a cascade of cellular suicide, starting from the optic glands and rippling outward through her tissues and organs until she dies”. (source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com

“The scientific jury is still out as to why these clever, resourceful creatures meet such an ignominious end, but there are several theories. Octopuses are serious cannibals, so a biologically programmed death spiral may be a way to keep mothers from eating their young.” (Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com)

on being a woman in the arts, on being a woman in South Africa, on being a woman in this world.

ON BEING is a group show featuring some of South Africa’s finest contemporary artists working in a range of mediums: painting, sculpture, drawing, ceramic and mixed media.

Does one celebrate women’s day in South Africa whilst we are facing a national crisis in gender-based violence? Is it tokenism to celebrate women for one day (or a month)? We asked these questions in discussions for this show. Women artists have and continue to hold their own in our space year-round. However, any opportunity to highlight women- we will take. The title of the show aims to speak to the lived experience of women in this country; it calls for celebration and mourning, as being a woman in South Africa means both. 

This exhibition features works not specifically made for a women’s exhibition, but have been selected by the curators as to offer an insight into the interior world of being a woman and to celebrate our artists by highlighting their work. 

We remember the 20 000+ women who marched on the streets in 1956. We pay tribute to them for their courage and strength. We pay tribute to all our women artists. We look to the future, knowing that there is still much to do.”  EVERARD READ FRANSCHOEK GALLERY PRESS RELEASE

The group Exhibition: “ON BEING/A WOMXN’S show” at Everard Read Franschoek openend yesterday and will run until the 7th of September 2020. Please visit their website for more information.

STILL

Art portfolio- my work, Studio news/blog

Two of my recent works: “Neighbourhood watch” and “Shit could be worse” are included in an online group exhibition titled: STILL (18 June – 8 July 2020)

Shit could be worse 81 x 71 cm Cotton thread and rubber 2020

STILL is the third in the Everard Read galleries’ series of online group exhibitions. This latest group show compromises works primarily created by invited and gallery artists during lockdown, when most artists didn’t have access to their studios, often having to adjust both their working methods and world views.

STILL references notions of ‘stillness’: from formal still life studies, to a slowing down in quiet contemplation. This exhibition imagines humankind’s resilience and perseverance during an unprecedented time of uncertainty.

STILL presents a variety of responses that explore ephemerality, nostalgia, wistfulness, beauty and order as well as chaos and turbulence. – from the Gallery newsletter

 

 

Neighbourhood watch 85 x 75 cm Cotton thread and rubber 2020 Hannalie Taute

ARTISTS INCLUDE

Sanell Aggenbach, Beth Diane Armstrong, Beezy Bailey, Deborah Bell, Kamyar Bineshtarigh, Arabella Caccia, Gail Catlin, Erin Chaplin, Hanien Conradie, Grace da Costa, Corlie de Kock, Ferdi B. Dick, Guy du Toit, Ricky Dyaloyi, Paul Emsley, Kerri Evans, Guy Ferrer, Lee-Ann Heath, Matthew Hindley, Swain Hoogervorst, Liza Grobler, Syndi Kahn, Vusi Khumalo, Teresa Kutala Firmino, Cobus Haupt, Lady Skollie, Daniel Levi, Dylan Lewis, Lorienne Lotz, Paula Louw, Michael MacGarry, Io Makandal, Colbert Mashile, Setlamorago Mashilo, Louise Mason, Diane McLean, Denby Meyer, John Meyer, Elsabe Milandri, Lucinda Mudge, Nigel Mullins, Brett Murray, Daniel Naudé, Blessing Ngobeni, Jo O’Connor, Alessandro Papetti, William Peers, Jaco Roux, Caryn Scrimgeour, Mmakgabo Sebidi, Andre Serfontein, Henk Serfontein, Bambo Sibiya, Skubalisto, Justin Southey, Ben Stanwix, Gary Stephens, Penelope Stutterheime, Rina Stutzer, Hannalie Taute, Angus Taylor, Jan Tshithukhula, Andrzej Urbanski, Shany van den Berg, Peter van Straten, Harold Voigt, Walter Voigt, Elize Vossgätter, Warther Dixon & Barbara Wildenboer

Neighborhood watch and Shit could be worse

For more information please contact Everard Read Franschoek.

A Monumental Moment

Art portfolio- my work

 

A Monumental Moment. Cotton tread and rubber. 171 x 127.5 cm

A Monumental Moment. Cotton tread and rubber. 171 x 127.5 cm

This work is inspired by the sculpture of Anton van Wouw which also featured on the cover of the magazine called “Die Boerevrou”(March 1919).

I looked at his sculpture while pondering my thoughts on being an “Afrikaner-meisie”.

I personally don’t like how the female “Boerevrou” figure is standing because she looks so demure and I always thought of Afrikaner women as strong; especially since they had to travel great distances in harsh and difficult circumstances (Die Groot Trek).

So I did a bit of research and found that women back in the day were not happy with his work since they believed that the “Voortrekker kappie’ depicted was not like the ones Afrikaner women wore in South Africa ….and much later when feminism reached South Africa women were upset because in the poem by JF Cilliers that featured underneath this work by van Wouw which ended with the words: “Ik sien haar win, want haar naam is – Vrouw en moeder”…and the feminist said that not all women are mothers.

That was when I decided to embroider myself in the nude sitting on the steps of this ‘monument’ with my back turned away from the ‘Boerevrou’…trying to redefine myself.

I am happy to announce that this work will be at this years FNB Joburg Art Fair (from 11- 13 September 2015); at the Everard Read gallery JHB booth. (photo courtesy Knysna Fine Art gallery)

This will be the first time my work will be exhibited at this art fair. Is this a monumental moment for my career, she wonders?